Why are so many horror movies set in the ‘80s?

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Many time-honored horror franchises have been killin’ it since the ‘80s, including Halloween, Friday the 13th, and A Nightmare On Elm Street, but have you ever wondered why the genre’s modern movies and TV series also remain trapped in the past? Maybe it’s the absence of cell phones and social media that encourage villains to continue to terrorize this fond decade, but we’re invested in getting to the bottom of this period of favoritism! 

Nostalgia for fans

Whether you lived through the vibrance of the ‘80s or your childhood was strongly influenced by the decade, it’s easy to become consumed by sentimental longing for something from our pasts; especially if this nostalgia brings you happiness. The entire style that hung over the decade, from the culmination of music, movies, and games, defined the pop culture of the time and there’s no arguing that films who manage to open this time capsule transport the audience to a simpler time where bold colors and permed hair were the trending styles and Walkmans, along with cable TV, were the epitome of technology. Even the small, suburban neighborhoods where everyone knew each other are part of the plot sequences that would build upon this false sense of security, a facade that slasher films love! After all, no one locks their doors or expects anything to happen in these tiny, boring communities. 

So, whether it’s a classic franchise that’s stuck in time or a new wave of horror embracing the decade, it’s clear there’s a reason you can buy horror collectibles online featuring friends and foes from the ‘80s. 

A connection to historic events

Some of the popularity that stems from the 1980s can be blamed on nostalgia and the desire for a seemingly simpler time, however, more often than not, it’s based on the interest of the historical events that occurred during the decade. There were many real-life serial killers, such as Richard Ramirez (The Night Stalker), Jeffrey Dahmer (The Cannibal Killer), and Joseph Christopher (The Midtown Slasher) and rumors of satanic cults and ritual abuse. So, in a way, the lack of modern computer technology spread the fear of real-life horror, which film and TV series later utilized to develop insane plots. Now, we buy horror collectibles online to idolize the historic events of the decade by adding action figures or plush to our home’s decor

Are there any other reasons that horror movies may still be utilizing the power of the ‘80s? Drop a comment below to contribute to the conversation.

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