Celebrate your St. Patrick’s Day by telling these 5 terrifying Irish legends

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Are you planning on watching the horror film Leprechaun in honor of St. Patrick’s Day this year? Within our thrilling community, the tale of this cereal-box mascot haunts our hearts on this annual holiday, and since there aren’t a lot of seasonal movies to choose from, we thought you might also enjoy learning about some creep-tastic folklore from the Emerald Isle. 

The Dubhlachan/Dubhlachain

Pronounced Dullahan for those that lack Irish annunciation, this being is a headless rider that foretells death. Carrying his phosphorescent head under his arm, the glow works as a makeshift lantern to light up the Irish countryside in search of the homes of the dying. As with any old wives’ tale, there are some variations, and in some tellings of the legends, the Dubhlachan actively seeks out victims, while in others he represents an omen of what’s to come. Needless to say, if you lock eyes with him, you will go blind in one eye or if you’re lucky, he will only throw a bucket of blood on you as a marking of his passing.

Ban Sidhe/Banshee

More familiar among horror memorabilia is the Ban Sidhe, a screeching female spirit who heralds the death of a family member by wailing loudly. Portrayed as both an old hag and a beautiful woman, the Ban Sidhe (sidhe is the Irish word for fairy) is known to hang around the Dubhlachan and conduct their work together. 

The Morrigan

This trinity of sisters foretell fate and war and those that believe in the legend of their existence also call them Babd, Macha, and Nemain. Often linked to the connections of Irish heritage to Viking and Norse mythology, Babd is known to take on the form of a crow (a symbolic bad omen). 

Leanan Sidhe

Yet another use of the word sidhe, this mythological entity is a muse that allows her host to create some of the most talented artists and inspired works of art. In exchange for their profound skills, she slowly drains the life from her victims until all that’s left is their beautiful legacy.  

Sluagh Sidhe

Wow! Faeries are a popular being in Irish folklore. The Sluagh Sidhe is an army of spirits who were evil in their past lives. Depraved even in death, they search from the sky for victims, and once found, shoot beim sidhe (evil spells) at them. They also target the vulnerability of the dying by taking their souls to join their clan after death. 

Supernatural stories are what inspires some of the best horror memorabilia! So, while St. Patrick’s Day will likely look a tad bit different than previous year’s celebrations, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for unknown lights and your eyes open for the screams of these Irish beings. 

Which of the above creatures needs its own horror flick? Drop a comment below to compare with other readers. 

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